1976 in Music

My music reviews for music that came out in 1976.

 

1. Philip Glass: Einstein on the Beach (10/10)

I am a very big fan of John Adams’ Nixon in China from pretty much the moment I heard it. It seemed impossible to me that two seemingly diametrically opposed styles of music could be merged s seamlessly. It’s safe to say it changed my (musical) life.

That experience is always shocking (in a wonderful way) to me, especially as I get older. I have been going out of my way to find supposed major events and touchstones in music history for about 15 years now, and every so often – sometimes every few months, sometimes less than once a year – I find something that I cannot believe I didn’t hear until I was [insert age here]. My life prior to listening to the thing now seems incomplete. That’s how I felt with Nixon in China. And that’s how I feel  about Einstein on the Beach, another supposed minimalist opera.

Read the full review.

 

2. Ramones (10/10)

I wrote the following before I came around to fully acclaiming this record:

The Ramones’ debut album begs the question: can we determine greatness without looking at influence? If the Ramones released this album, and it didn’t influence half the rock musicians alive today (maybe a slight exaggeration) would we still consider it great?

Read the full review.

 

3. David Bowie: Station to Station (10/10)

From the very opening of that train sample, it’s obvious that things are going to be different than Young Americans. Whereas that album felt like a flirtation with something Bowie was only interested in passing (albeit good at), this feels like Bowie again.

Opening an album with your longest track ever sends a really interesting message, as does opening with a sample. With the exception of “Golden Years,” the soul and R&B here is filtered through Bowie’s artsy lens in a way that it wasn’t on Young Americans and, with hindsight, we can see the genesis of the Berlin Trilogy in this weird amalgam of American R&B and art rock (with just a hint of Krautrock – or is that hindsight speaking?).

Whether or not this record is the artistic achievement that is Ziggy, or Aladdin Sane, or any of The Berlin Trilogy, or Scary Monsters…well, I’m not sure. But it’s among his best, and it’s among my very favourite Bowie albums (probably #3).
A classic.

 

4. Bob Dylan: Desire (9/10)

This is an interesting record for numerous reasons – Dylan’s first work with a co-lyricist, it’s a return to “protest” song-writing (on two tracks, anyway), and various other reasons. It might also be the last “great” Dylan album. Not 100% sure.

It’s certainly a radical lyrical about-face from the extremely confessional (or extremely Chekhov-obsessed, depending on who you believe) Blood on the Tracks (with the notable exception of “Sara”).

Sure, Dylan’s lyrics are more accessible, but they’re still often among the best around. And a few of these songs are among his very best, including “Hurricane” (is this the first “true crime” song?) and “Sara” (which is devastating).

But there are some weaker tracks, like the seemingly endless, interminable mob apologia “Joey.”

I can’t quite decide whether it’s classic Dylan, despite its differences from his peak 10 years earlier. But it’s up there. It’s likely his second best album of the ’70s. And probably the last (nearly) essential record he ever made.

 

5. The Modern Lovers (9/10)

Read the review.

 

6. Joni Mitchell: Hejira (9/10)

Though maybe not Mitchell’s very best album, this is possibly my favourite, as it contains my favourite song (“Coyote”).

The set of songs is among her very best, and it’s free of the experimentation of Hissing. Not that it was a bad thing, but this record is more consistent, with jazz more fully incorporated into her sound and, overall, just a stronger set.

 

7. Jaco Pastorius (9/10)

 

8. Rush: 2112 (9/10)

Though I’ve never heard any of their earlier records this is, by all accounts, the record that made Rush Rush. In the ’70s Rush was either the heaviest prog rock band or the most progressive hard rock/metal band. Either way, they basically invented progressive metal (at least the idea of it, if not the sound). And this is the fundamental document. Until they started trying new things with Permanent Waves, the subsequent Rush albums of this era were all made in the shadow of this record. They may have gotten better at songwriting, but they never really achieved something like this again.

 

9. Henry Gorecki: Sympony No. 3 (8/10)

I think this is the ‘Adagio for Strings’ of the Polish avant garde / Holy minimalist schools, which is both a good thing and a bad thing. It’s obvious why its popular (well, if you put aside its length) and its also obvious why so many music nerds hate its popularity or even hate it: it’s too easy to love for something written by a guy who’s supposed to be “avant”.

I really like it, but I understand why it isn’t exactly forward-thinking. As someone else commented, ‘sometimes beauty transcends reason.’ Couldn’t say it better myself.

 

10. Van Der Graaf Generator: Still Life (8/10)

Sometime between 2007 and 2014, I wrote the following:

This is the cleanest produced VDGG album I’ve heard so far (it’s the fourth I’ve heard), and that’s both a good thing and a bad thing. On the positive, Hammill’s voice has never been so front and centre, and you can really hear how incredible a singer he is – if an album like this doesn’t convince you he was one of the best male rock singers of the ’70s, there’s no saving you. On the other hand, the appealing murk of earlier albums – ‘is that an organ, a guitar or an electric saxophone I am hearing right now?’ – is missing and so therefore some of their sense of mystery. I’m not actually sure that’s a bad thing, it just takes some getting used to. Hammill also barely plays guitar, which takes getting used to as well. But now that I’ve adjusted to the ‘improved’ sound I can’t help but love it. There were few performers like Hammill at his peak, even if the music behind him sometimes sounds too…I don’t know: easy? Is that fair? (It doesn’t help that I’ve heard “Still Life” live first, where it is significantly rawer.) This is probably my least favourite VDGG album, but that isn’t really a criticism, as the band is still one of the rare prog bands that still sounds great despite the passage of years. That’s a really rare feat, actually, and its something that should be celebrated.

Do I agree? Not really. It’s a pretty great record. I don’t know that it’s that less complex. Maybe a bit, but this is still quite proggy. Not my least favourite of theirs any more.

 

11. Jim Hall: Live! (8/10)

Jim Hall is an excellent guitarist. I had never heard him before, but he’s fantastic. And, on this date, he’s backed by a great band, again made up of two guys I don’t know. And they are excellent as well. And the whole thing is fantastic.

But I can’t shake one feeling, and that is that this record was made in 1975 and this is absolutely, totally bop. (Well, if I’m being honest, I guess it’s post bop, but you get my meaning.) And it’s the mid seventies. And he’s doing his thing, and his thing is great, but it’s kind of dated. I mean, grow a little man.

Listening to this record makes me want to seek out his earlier stuff, as he’s undoubtedly one of the great bop guitarists and I can’t believe it’s taken me so long to hear him. But I can’t quite go gaga about it.

 

12. Wild Tchoupitoulas (8/10)

A great combination of funk and traditional New Orleans sounds. The real deal, I suspect (though I have never been here). I can’t really imagine anyone recording this with the aim of selling records outside of New Orleans.

 

13. Jeff Beck: Wired (8/10)

 

14. AC/DC: High Voltage [International Version] (8/10)

Read the review.

 

15. Aerosmith: Rocks (8/10)

Read the review.

 

16. Mauricio Kagel: MM51 [piano version] (7/10)

The piano version of MM51 is for piano and metronome. That’s something new for me. The metronome appears to speed up and slow down slightly (though I guess that could be some kind of aural illusion based on the piano part…). It’s an interesting piece; I can’t say that I’ve ever heard anything like it before.

 

17. Led Zeppelin: Presence (7/10)

 

18. Rainbow: Rising (7/10)

Read the review.

 

19. The Residents Present the Third Reich ‘n Roll (7/10)

There are a couple of truly great things about this record, despite its rather impenetrable “music.”

The first is the cover, which is one of my favourite album covers of all time. I am firmly on board with the idea that Dick Clark was not helpful in his role in promoting shitty music throughout his career.

The second thing is that, as someone who grew up with a lot of these songs (not because I was alive, but because I listened to “oldies” radio), some of these are so hilarious and they highlight the inanity of so much of the music we listen to and love.

And I think we can see the origins of things like plunderphonics in music like this. After listening to a record like this, your idea of what music is and what it isn’t is considerably expanded.

But this is impenetrable stuff for anyone who is not on board with the joke. And, I should note, it’s a one-note joke (albeit a hilarious one-note joke). And they don’t fully commit to their “pop music is fascism” idea and I think a truly great record like this would have gone all-in on that idea, especially with that cover.

But still, an eye-opening record when I first heard it, and one of my favourite music-as-practical-joke records.

 

20. Gentle Giant: Interview (7/10)

Read the review.

 

21. The Runaways (7/10)

Read the review.

 

22. Led Zeppelin: The Song Remains the Same (7/10).

 

23. Steely Dan: The Royal Scam (6/10)

Read the review.

 

24. Blue Öyster Cult: Agents of Fortune (6/10)

Read the review.

 

25. Eagles: Hotel California (6/10)

Read the grudging review of how it’s not awful.

 

26. Parliament: The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein (6/10)

Read the review.

 

27. Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band: Night Moves (6/10)

Not my thing but at least he’s passionate. Read the review.

 

28. Warren Zevon (6/10)

Read the review.

 

29. Genesis: Wind and Wuthering (6/10)

 

29. Genesis: A Trick of the Tail (6/10)

The beginning of the end.

 

31. Electric Light Orchestra: A New World Record (6/10)

Despite deciding I was going to get into ELO when I was 16 or 17, I never actually did. So I have no idea how this to compares to any of their other records.I believe this is supposed to be their best, or at least their most popular. Anyway…

Read the rest of the review.

 

32. AC/DC: Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap (5/10)

Read the review.

 

33. Steve Miller Band: Fly Like an Eagle (5/10)

Read the review.

 

34. Colosseum II: Strange New Flesh (5/10)

Read the review.

 

35. Boston (5/10)

Read the review.

 

36. Santana: Amigos (4/10)

 

37. KISS: Destroyer (3/10)

Read the disparaging review.

 

Gong: Gazeuse!

Not Ranked: The Philadelphia Orchestra, The Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia conducted by Eugene Ormandy: The Planets by Gustav Holst (8/10)

Read the review.

 

Singles

Ray Charles: “America the Beautiful” (6/10)

It would have been interesting to listen to this song in 1976, 5 years before I was born, instead of listening to it after having to put up with it for a decade and a half as some kind of badge of American patriotism and exceptionalism, which is what it is now. This song is so obnoxious in its current form and us Canadians who are exposed to it regularly while we are exposed to the all the things that make the US a country with problems like every other country in history.

But Charles’ version is listenable in a way I never would have imagined. I still hate the song, but his performance makes me not want to burn copies of the lyrics, which is something.

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